Perfect Materia Medica of the Mind

Perfect Materia Medica of the Mind

  • Dr. Yogesh Sehgal

SEH100

$35.00

$29.75

Overview

Mind rubrics have been drawn from the Synthetic Repertory and grouped by remedy, then separated into singular symptoms and common symptoms.

Additions from Synthesis, Murphy, and Dr Sehgal's own work round it out.

India
1243 pp hb

Details

Perfect Materia Medica of Mind by Yogesh Sehgal, Sanjay Sehgal and Preeti Sehgal, was published in 1998.

The Sehgals have taken Mind rubrics from the Synthetic Repertory and grouped them by remedy, separated them into singular symptoms-termed Alone and common symptoms; termed With others.

The additions come from Synthesis and Murphy as well as Sehgal's own work. The cross-references and variations in additions of medicines are given in each remedy list.

Some interpretations of the rubrics themselves, as developed by Sehgal, are also included. Sehgal's method of extending our understanding of what the rubrics mean is exemplified here.

Though his introduction discusses his approach it does not lay the full foundation. This is not the most suitable book for beginning homeopaths or those not already conversant with Sehgal's work.

Contents

Dedication -- I
Foreword -- II
Acknowledgement -- III
Preface -- IV
Introduction -- VI
Architecture and Assistance -- IX
Index of Remedies -- X

Reviews

From
THE HOMEOPATH
Reviewed by Adele Miller

It is rare indeed to find the level of honesty shown in publishing the foreword and preface to this book, as they are penned by two of the 'great and good' of homoeopathy, Dr H.L. Chitkara and Dr Rajan Sankaran.

The honesty lies in the fact that there is no glowing over-enthusiastic endorsement of the book or indeed of the method so critically underpinning it, in their words, to say the least.

Yet how truly in the nature of the homoeopathic endeavour is this book. The Sehgals submit an open attempt to extend the utility of the rubrics of the Mind and their expression in the remedies we think we know and love! It seeks not your approval but your critique with the aim of improving the next edition.

Here is a great tool for all homoeopaths although I fear the use of it may be missed by colleagues unfamiliar, or indeed uncomfortable, with the philosophy of Dr Sehgal. I can only recommend that the user becomes an 'unprejudiced observer' where appropriate.

Since there are several similar works already published, Dr Chitkara's own and Dr Agrawal's being perhaps two of the most familiar in use, there really has to be some distinct benefit in presenting another. In my opinion, this book meets and overcomes this challenge.

The authors have drawn Mind rubrics from the Synthetic Repertory and grouped them by remedy, separated into singular symptoms; termed Alone and common symptoms; termed With others. The additions are the significant 'added value', coming from Synthesis and Murphy as well as Dr Sehgal's own work.

The cross references and variations in additions of medicines are also clearly given in each remedy list. Finally, some interpretations of the rubrics themselves, as developed by Dr Sehgal, are also included.

This is where the advantage of this work is to be had. When one reaches for a book of reference to find not only painstaking details, near-completeness but also inspiration, it makes every dip into it a joy and a revelation.

Out of the window goes our in-built 'remedy pictures' and in come new insights as we learn how patient language and rubric language become not a struggle but harmonious.

The Law of Least Effort would seem to apply: 'do less and accomplish more'. Instead of struggling to make the patient expression 'fit' the rubric, the selection seems obvious, not because of sloppiness but because of a detailed understanding of the rubric language itself.

It is undoubtedly rather humbling when one learns the real meanings of one's own language from someone working in, to him, a 'foreign' language. Dr Sehgal and a dictionary go hand in hand as he teases out each part of a rubric to extend our understanding.

To take one example from the list of Bryonia (although this hardly seems to be doing full justice to the work one has to start somewhere):

The interpretation given to 'DISTURBED, averse to being' is: 'It is both ways, if already disturbed wants to remove disturbance, if settled will not like to be unsettled. What can be disturbed?

Something that is at peace or rest or stationary. Suppose there is a tank full of water, and in a state of complete tranquillity if a stone is thrown into it the water will be said to have been disturbed or unsettled. Also displaced from its seat or original position. This may be otherwise also.

Something is already disturbed and is trying to regain its original position i.e. the state of peace and in that process of restoration if he gets interference of any kind, he will not like it and resent it. That state of mind will also be called 'Disturbed, averse to being'.' Thinking of this rubric along these lines allows us to see the state of the patient as brought before us from a wider perspective.

Similarly, in Aconitum napellus, one finds some rubrics given a wider meaning and application. For example: 'Absorbed, buried in thought' is shown as 'Absorbed person is present but is so deeply involved that he is not available on the surface as if sucked in...' The 'ABUSIVE, insulting' rubric is widened thus: 'it may be one's tongue by using filthy languages, one's authority or position by taking undue advantage of it'.

In the listing of rubrics for Sulphur, an 'Alone' symptom is 'Delusion, thin, is getting'. The sense and possible expression of this is: 'The sensation is that he is getting thin day by day. The process seems to be continuous. About the mental set up he feels that he is losing or has lost grit, guts or self-confidence'.

These examples are intended to convey the extra value the Sehgals bring to our homeopathic understanding of rubric meaning and wider possible presentation in a case.

The difference of views between Drs Sankaran and Sehgal may be read in their entirety in this book. However, it is worth mentioning the interpretation of the Kali bromatum delusion 'her brother fell overboard in her sight' given here by Dr Sehgal. In itself this illustrates his caution that a single 'core point' should not solely be relied upon.

Rather, it should be supported by the help of many rubrics in the remedy which are essential to confirm the correctness of the prescription.

What lies behind Dr Sehgal's assertion that her feeling is 'that for no fault on her part she has been singled out for divine vengeance. Her mind is captivated with the thought that death has taken away her son and brother... may be the rubrics:

'Delusion, God, vengeance, object of God's vengeance, he is the' and 'Delusion, dead, child was, her'. In fact, if one turns to the Alone list for this remedy, one may find rubrics to support each part of his description of the feelings of Kali brom.

The philosophy of Dr Sehgal is beyond the scope of a book review. There are many misunderstandings and misrepresentations of the method; those intrigued have the earlier publications by Dr Sehgal from which to learn more. His own Introduction to this work takes up one or two gauntlets and gives an outline of the method.

It seems to me to be a real 'scientific' debate being given expression here; healthy stuff for us all. All too often it seems a 'bandwagon' is alighted upon, everyone rushes to join and dissenters receive short shrift. Alternatively, new ideas may find stony ground... The very opposite of a healthy discipline, to me.

Turning to practicalities: Inevitably, the increase in detail leads this book into one of the 'downsides' of works such as Synthesis itself - bulk! It is a large volume and weighty; the print quality as so often with Indian books sometimes variable and the paper slightly transparent.

The listing of the 916 remedies with page references is logical but sometimes frustrating. However, given the scope of the work and its nature, like Synthesis, one accepts these minor defects because the quality of the content far outweighs them.

Homoeopaths in my experience find parting with large sums of money for books of this size difficult; as they go, this one is a real bargain and a European publisher would be asking at least three times as much. Splash out and enjoy!

The Homeopath, Number 72
Reprinted with permission from the From THE HOMEOPATH

Reviewed by Adele Miller

It is rare indeed to find the level of honesty shown in publishing the foreword and preface to this book, as they are penned by two of the 'great and good' of homoeopathy, Dr H.L. Chitkara and Dr Rajan Sankaran.

The honesty lies in the fact that there is no glowing over-enthusiastic endorsement of the book or indeed of the method so critically underpinning it, in their words, to say the least.

Yet how truly in the nature of the homoeopathic endeavour is this book. The Sehgals submit an open attempt to extend the utility of the rubrics of the Mind and their expression in the remedies we think we know and love! It seeks not your approval but your critique with the aim of improving the next edition.

Here is a great tool for all homoeopaths although I fear the use of it may be missed by colleagues unfamiliar, or indeed uncomfortable, with the philosophy of Dr Sehgal. I can only recommend that the user becomes an 'unprejudiced observer' where appropriate.

Since there are several similar works already published, Dr Chitkara's own and Dr Agrawal's being perhaps two of the most familiar in use, there really has to be some distinct benefit in presenting another. In my opinion, this book meets and overcomes this challenge.

The authors have drawn Mind rubrics from the Synthetic Repertory and grouped them by remedy, separated into singular symptoms; termed Alone and common symptoms; termed With others. The additions are the significant 'added value', coming from Synthesis and Murphy as well as Dr Sehgal's own work.

The cross references and variations in additions of medicines are also clearly given in each remedy list. Finally, some interpretations of the rubrics themselves, as developed by Dr Sehgal, are also included.

This is where the advantage of this work is to be had. When one reaches for a book of reference to find not only painstaking details, near-completeness but also inspiration, it makes every dip into it a joy and a revelation.

Out of the window goes our in-built 'remedy pictures' and in come new insights as we learn how patient language and rubric language become not a struggle but harmonious.

The Law of Least Effort would seem to apply: 'do less and accomplish more'. Instead of struggling to make the patient expression 'fit' the rubric, the selection seems obvious, not because of sloppiness but because of a detailed understanding of the rubric language itself.

It is undoubtedly rather humbling when one learns the real meanings of one's own language from someone working in, to him, a 'foreign' language. Dr Sehgal and a dictionary go hand in hand as he teases out each part of a rubric to extend our understanding.

To take one example from the list of Bryonia (although this hardly seems to be doing full justice to the work one has to start somewhere):

The interpretation given to 'DISTURBED, averse to being' is: 'It is both ways, if already disturbed wants to remove disturbance, if settled will not like to be unsettled. What can be disturbed?

Something that is at peace or rest or stationary. Suppose there is a tank full of water, and in a state of complete tranquillity if a stone is thrown into it the water will be said to have been disturbed or unsettled. Also displaced from its seat or original position. This may be otherwise also.

Something is already disturbed and is trying to regain its original position i.e. the state of peace and in that process of restoration if he gets interference of any kind, he will not like it and resent it. That state of mind will also be called 'Disturbed, averse to being'.' Thinking of this rubric along these lines allows us to see the state of the patient as brought before us from a wider perspective.

Similarly, in Aconitum napellus, one finds some rubrics given a wider meaning and application. For example: 'Absorbed, buried in thought' is shown as 'Absorbed person is present but is so deeply involved that he is not available on the surface as if sucked in...' The 'ABUSIVE, insulting' rubric is widened thus: 'it may be one's tongue by using filthy languages, one's authority or position by taking undue advantage of it'.

In the listing of rubrics for Sulphur, an 'Alone' symptom is 'Delusion, thin, is getting'. The sense and possible expression of this is: 'The sensation is that he is getting thin day by day. The process seems to be continuous. About the mental set up he feels that he is losing or has lost grit, guts or self-confidence'.

These examples are intended to convey the extra value the Sehgals bring to our homeopathic understanding of rubric meaning and wider possible presentation in a case.

The difference of views between Drs Sankaran and Sehgal may be read in their entirety in this book. However, it is worth mentioning the interpretation of the Kali bromatum delusion 'her brother fell overboard in her sight' given here by Dr Sehgal. In itself this illustrates his caution that a single 'core point' should not solely be relied upon.

Rather, it should be supported by the help of many rubrics in the remedy which are essential to confirm the correctness of the prescription.

What lies behind Dr Sehgal's assertion that her feeling is 'that for no fault on her part she has been singled out for divine vengeance. Her mind is captivated with the thought that death has taken away her son and brother... may be the rubrics:

'Delusion, God, vengeance, object of God's vengeance, he is the' and 'Delusion, dead, child was, her'. In fact, if one turns to the Alone list for this remedy, one may find rubrics to support each part of his description of the feelings of Kali brom.

The philosophy of Dr Sehgal is beyond the scope of a book review. There are many misunderstandings and misrepresentations of the method; those intrigued have the earlier publications by Dr Sehgal from which to learn more. His own Introduction to this work takes up one or two gauntlets and gives an outline of the method.

It seems to me to be a real 'scientific' debate being given expression here; healthy stuff for us all. All too often it seems a 'bandwagon' is alighted upon, everyone rushes to join and dissenters receive short shrift. Alternatively, new ideas may find stony ground... The very opposite of a healthy discipline, to me.

Turning to practicalities: Inevitably, the increase in detail leads this book into one of the 'downsides' of works such as Synthesis itself - bulk! It is a large volume and weighty; the print quality as so often with Indian books sometimes variable and the paper slightly transparent.

The listing of the 916 remedies with page references is logical but sometimes frustrating. However, given the scope of the work and its nature, like Synthesis, one accepts these minor defects because the quality of the content far outweighs them.

Homoeopaths in my experience find parting with large sums of money for books of this size difficult; as they go, this one is a real bargain and a European publisher would be asking at least three times as much. Splash out and enjoy!

The Homeopath, Number 72
Reprinted with permission from the Society of Homeopaths
http://www.homeopathy-soh.org