Minerals in Plants

Minerals in Plants

  • Jan Scholten

SCH220

$32.00

Overview

100 lesser-known plants are analyzed for 22 minerals in this book.

It may assist in finding related or more curative options for tough cases.

Netherlands
160 pp pb

Details

Minerals in Plants, by Jan Scholten, was published in 1993.

This book provides a statistical analysis of the mineral content (22 minerals) of 100 plants. The premise is that the mineral content of a plant relates to its possible homeopathic use.

In the future Scholten proposes:

"This kind of analysis should be repeated often with plants from different regions and climates, from different kinds of soil, with different varieties of plants. More minerals should be analyzed with different techniques by different laboratories."

Contents

Acknowledgement -- 4
Contents -- 5-7
Introduction -- 8
Discussion -- 9
Detection Limits -- 10
Literature -- 10

PART 1: Plants -- 11-114
Acorus calamus -- 13
Aesculus hippocastanum -- 14
Agnus castus -- 15
Alchemilla vulgaris -- 16
Allium sativum -- 17
Althea officinalis -- 18
Ananassa comosus -- 19
Angelica archangelica -- 20
Arctium lappa -- 21
Ballota foetida -- 22
Berberis vulgaris -- 23
Beta vulgaris -- 24
Betula alba -- 25
Boldo fragrans -- 26
Carduus marianus -- 27
Carica papaya -- 28
Caroube -- 29
Carragheen -- 30
Carum carvi -- 31
Chamomilla -- 32
China officinalis -- 33
Chrysanthellum americanum -- 34
Chrysanthemum parthenium -- 35
Crataegus oxyacantha -- 36
Cupressus sempervirens -- 37
Curcuma -- 38
Cynara scolymus -- 39
Echinacea angustifolia -- 40
Echinacea purpurea -- 41
Eleutherococcus -- 42
Equisetum arvense -- 43
Erigeron canadensis -- 44
Eschscholtzia californica -- 45
Eucalyptus -- 46
Eugenia caryophyllata -- 47
Fenugrec -- 48
Foeniculum vulgare -- 49
Fraxinus excelior -- 50
Fucus vesiculosus -- 51
Fumaria officinalis -- 52
Gentiana lutea -- 53
Ginkgo biloba -- 54
Ginseng -- 55
Glycyrrhiza glabra -- 56
Hamamelis virginia -- 57
Harpagophytum procumbens -- 58
Hibiscus sabdarifae -- 59
Hieracium pilosella -- 60
Humulus lupulus -- 61
Hydrocotyle asiatica -- 62
Hyoscyamus niger -- 63
Hypericum perforatum -- 64
Juniperus communis -- 65
Lespedeza capitata -- 66
Lithospermum -- 67
Lotus corniculatus -- 68
Marrubium vulgare -- 69
Medicago sativa -- 70
Melilotus officinalis -- 71
Melissa officinalis -- 72
Mentha piperita -- 73
Millefolium -- 74
Nasturtium officinalis -- 75
Olea europaea -- 76
Orthosiphon stamineus -- 77
Passiflora incarnata -- 78
Phaseolus vulgaris -- 79
Pinus maritima -- 80
Piper methysticum -- 81
Plantago lanceolata -- 82
Raphanus sativus niger -- 83
Rhamnus frangula -- 84
Rhamnus purshiana -- 85
Rheum officinalis -- 86
Ribes nigrum folia -- 87
Ribes nigrum fructus -- 88
Rosa canina -- 89
Rosmarinus officinalis -- 90
Ruscus aculeatus -- 91
Salix alba -- 92
Saliva officinalis -- 93
Sarsaparilla -- 94
Senna -- 95
Solidago virga aurea -- 96
Spiraea ulmaria -- 97
Spiruline nebl -- 98
Spiruline poud -- 99
Taraxacum -- 100
Thymus vulgaris -- 101
Tilia alburnum -- 102
Tilia cordata -- 103
Urtica dioica -- 104
Uva ursi -- 105
Vaccinium myrtillus -- 106
Valeriana officinalis -- 107
Vinca minor -- 108
Viola tricolor -- 109
Viscum album -- 110
Vitis vinifera -- 111
Zingiber officinalis -- 112

PART 2: Elements -- 115-159
Aluminium -- 116*117
Arsenic -- 118-119
Cadmium -- 120-121
Calcium -- 122-123
Chromium -- 124-125
Cobalt -- 126-127
Copper -- 128-129
Germanium -- 130-131
Iron -- 132-133
Lead -- 134-135
Lithium -- 136-137
Magnesium -- 138-139
Manganese -- 140-141
Mercury -- 142-143
Molybden -- 144-145
Nickel -- 146-147
Phosphorus -- 148-149
Potassium -- 150-151
Selenium -- 152-153
Sodium -- 154-155
Vanadium -- 156-157
Zinc -- 156

Jan Scholten, MD

(1951 -     )
 
 

Jan Scholten was born on December 23rd, 1951, in Helmond, The Netherlands.

Jan studied chemistry, philosophy, medicine, acupuncture and homeopathy. In addition, he studied many other alternative health disciplines, such as orthomolecular medicine, herbalism, and Bach Flower remedies. From 1985 onward, he has had a full time classical homeopathic practice.

Jan studied with many renowned teachers, including Roger Morrisson, George Vithoulkas, Alphons Geukens, Künzli, Bill Gray and many others. In 1988, he founded the "Homeopathic Doctors Center Utrecht" together with Maria Davits and Rienk Stuut. The Center has grown ever since and now hosts eleven working homeopaths.

Jan is known worldwide through his books "Homeopathy and Minerals" and "Homeopathy and the Elements". Further developments of Dr. Scholten include explorations into the plant kingdom, particularly studying botanical families like the Compositae.

Jan Scholten has lectured all over the world, including Great Britain, Germany, Austria, France, Spain, Norway, Ireland, Poland, Tsechia, Hungary, Italy, Israel, India, the U.S.A., Australia and New Zealand.

He is affiliated with the SHO Wageningen. He is the president of Stichting Alonissos and the advisor of SHO.

Reviews

From
LINKS
Reviewed by Jan Bol MD-The Netherlands

In producing his world-famous book on minerals and elements, Jan Scholten must have had many ideas not ripe enough to fit into the structure of that brilliant work.

One of the thoughts that came to his mind was to compare the plant's mineral spectrum with its homeopathic picture.

A study on this theme is now published by Scholten, showing the results of an analysis done some years ago on the mineral contents in plants.

It's an experimental study with only 22 minerals analysed in 100 mostly not well-known plants (like for instance Marrubium, Lespedeza, Eugenia, Carica papaya and Ballota foetida). To be honest, in 150 pages of lists and charts full of test results, you'll find more questions than answers.

But don't worry, the statistics in this book contain some intriguing stuff. some high mineral levels like manganum in the helpful Betula alba and lithium in the extreme Hyoscyamus niger support the materia medica picture.

Also remarkable are the highest levels of cuprum, selenium, molybdenum and magnesium all in one plant: Vitis vinifera (Vine tree). Hard for me to understand are the completely different mineral profiles of 'twin plants' like Echinacea aug stifolia/echinacea pur-purea and Tilia alburnum /Tilia cordata.

And how about the resemblance between the remedy pictures of Valeriana officinalis and Zincum etallicum, while Valerian appears to have one of the lowest zinc levels of all tested plants?

Questions, questions and more (exciting) questions, not to be answered yet by Jan Scholten who admits he cannot draw too many conclusions as he states: 'This kind of analysis should be repeated often with plants from different regions and climates, from different kinds of soil, with different varieties of plants. More minerals should be analysed with different techniques by different laboratories.'

Homeopathic Links
Volume 14, Number 4, Winter 2001
Reprinted with permission from Homeopathic Links