Introduction to Homeopathic Medicine 2nd ed.

Introduction to Homeopathic Medicine 2nd ed.

  • Hamish W. Boyd, MB, ChB, FRCP, DCH, FFHom

BOY100

$34.95

Overview

More than just an introductory book, it contains a small materia medica that is useful in differentiating between remedies in acute conditions.

This is a handy reference book for the busy general practitioner or the home prescriber.

Clearly laid out and well presented; the material is divided into chapters designed for easy reference.

UK
285 pp pb
ISBN 0-906584-21-3
Beaconsfield Publishers, Ltd.

Details

This book provides a systematic introduction to the principles of homoeopathic medicine. It shows how the homoeopath's selection of a remedy is based on a process that goes beyond the diagnosis of a particular condition to a perception of the patient as a whole and individual person.

The homoeopathic materia medica is discussed in relation to the systems of the body and the patient's presenting complaints, in a framework that will be familiar to any doctor. The author uses this framework to describe the subsequent management of the patient in homoeopathic terms.

He describes the clinical conditions in which homoeopathy is particularly useful, and those where conventional treatment is likely to be necessary, as well as the circumstances where orthodox medicine and homoeopathic medicine can fruitfully be used in conjunction with one another.

The symptom pictures of fifty-five of the most important remedies are then described in detail, offering the reader a sufficient basis on which to introduce them into his or her own practice.

Dr. Margaret Tyler's valuable Study of Kent's Repertory is given as an Appendix.

From the Book

  • In what important ways is homoeopathy different from conventional medicine?
  • What is meant by 'the homoeopathic approach'?
  • What is the homoeopath's concept of chronic disease?
  • How does homoeopathic case-taking differ from conventional case-taking?
  • Which are the remedies you need to know in detail, and how do you prescribe them?

This book provides a systematic introduction to the principles of homoeopathic medicine. It shows how the homoeopath's selection of a remedy is based on a process that goes beyond the diagnosis of a particular condition to a perception of the patient as a whole and individual person.

The homoeopathic materia medica is discussed in relation to the systems of the body and the patient's presenting complaints, in a framework that will be familiar to any doctor. The author uses this framework to describe the subsequent management of the patient in homoeopathic terms.

He describes the clinical conditions in which homoeopathy is particularly useful, and those where conventional treatment is likely to be necessary, as well as the circumstances where orthodox medicine and homoeopathic medicine can fruitfully be used in conjunction with one another.

The symptom pictures of fifty-five of the most important remedies are then described in detail, offering the reader a sufficient basis on which to introduce them into his or her own practice.

Dr. Margaret Tyler's valuable Study of Kent's Repertory is given as an Appendix.

Contents

Preface to the Second Edition -- vi
Preface to the First Edition -- vii

PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF HOMEOPATHY -- 1-74
1. What is Homeopathy? -- 1-4

2. The Origins of Homeopathy -- 5-8

3. What does Homeopathy Offer? -- 9-14
Conditions where conventional treatment is essential -- 9-14
-Surgery -- 9
-Deficiencies -- 9
-Severe infections -- 10
-Homeopathy in primary care -- 10
-First aid and injury -- 10
-Acute infections and respiratory disease -- 10-11
-Gastrointestinal illness -- 12
-Rheumatism and arthritis -- 12
-Headaches -- 12
-Skin conditions -- 12
-Genito-urinary disease -- 13
-Cardiovascular disease -- 13
-Psychosomatic illness and anxiety states -- 14

4. The Materia Medica -- 15-18
The remedy picture -- 16-17
Repertories -- 18

5. Case-taking and Diagnosis -- 19-52
Acute case-taking -- 20
Chronic case-taking -- 20-28
-The complaint and present history -- 20
-Onset and course of the illness -- 20
-Modalities -- 21
-Past history -- 21
-Family history -- 21
-Physical characteristics -- 22
-General physical symptoms -- 22-24
-Mental symptoms -- 25
-Mental characteristics -- 26
-Particular symptoms -- 27
-Common symptoms -- 27
-Strange, rare and peculiar symptoms -- 27
-Observation -- 27-28
The constitutional remedy and the fundamental remedy -- 29-30
Chronic illness -- 31-32
Acute case-taking summary(table 5.1) -- 33
Chronic case-taking summary(table 5.2) -- 34-35
Case histories -- 36-52

6. The Preparation of Homeopathic Remedies -- 53-54

7. Principles of Prescribing and Administration of the Remedy -- 55-63
The like remedy -- 55
The single remedy -- 56
The single dose -- 56
The homeopathic aggravation -- 56
Directions of cure -- 57
Administration of the remedy -- 57-62
Precautions when using homeopathic remedies -- 63

8. Research -- 64-73
Scientific evidence of homeopathic principles -- 64
Provings -- 64
Laboratory evidence of homeopathic potencies -- 65-66
Clinical research -- 67-68
Veterinary trials -- 69
References -- 70-73

SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO MATERIA MEDICA -- 74-257

Common acute remedies -- 74
Polychrest remedies of wide action -- 74

9. Accident and Injury Remedies 75-80
Accidents and first aid -- 75-77
Head injuries -- 78
Insect and plant stings, and insect bites -- 79
Burns -- 79
Heatstroke -- 79
Chilling -- 80

10. Headache -- 81-88
Causes and investigation -- 84
Acute headache remedies -- 82-83
Chronic headache remedies -- 84-88

11. Eye Remedies -- 89-94
Cataract -- 89
Conjunctivitis -- 89
Corneal ulcer -- 90
Detached retina -- 91
Diabetic retinopathy -- 91
Epiphora -- 91
Eye strain -- 92
Glaucoma simplex -- 92
Injury -- 92
Acute iritis -- 93
Macular lesions -- 93
Meibomian cyst -- 93
Retinal hemorrhage -- 93
Scleritis -- 93
Seborrhoeic blepharitis -- 93
Squint -- 94
Styes -- 94
Vitreous hemorrhage -- 94

12. The Respiratory Tract -- 95-104
Acute colds and Hayfever -- 95-96
Croup -- 97
Fevers, coughs and chest infections -- 97-100
Influenza -- 101
Sore throats -- 102
Infectious fevers -- 103
-Chickenpox -- 103
-Measles -- 103
-Mumps -- 104
-Whooping cough -- 104
-Glandular fever -- 104
Teething -- 104

13. The Cardiovascular System -- 105-110
Tinctures -- 105
Angina -- 106-107
Heart failure -- 108-110

14. The Gastrointestinal Tract -- 111-120
Stomach remedies -- 112-115
Bowel remedies -- 116-117
Constipation -- 118
Piles -- 119-120

15. The Genito-Urinary Tract -- 121-126
Urinary remedies -- 121-122
Gynecological remedies -- 123-124
Dysmenorrhea -- 125
Menopause -- 126

16. Skin Remedies -- 127-133
General remedies -- 128-130
Acne -- 131
Boils and abscesses -- 132
Shingles -- 132-133

17. Rheumatic and Arthritic Conditions -- 134-139

18. Remedies of Depression and Anxiety -- 140-144
Depression -- 141-142
Restlessness, violence and delirium -- 143-144

19. Remedies in the Elderly -- 145-147

20. Children's Remedies -- 148-164
Acute conditions -- 148
Chronic conditions- Borland's five groups -- 149-164

21. The Nosodes -- 165-171
The bowel nosodes -- 165-167
Nosodes from diseased tissue -- 168

MATERIA MEDICA -- 172-257

22. Fifty-Five Common Remedies Described in Greater Detail -- 172-257
Alumina -- 172-173
Apis -- 174-175
Argentum Nitricum -- 176
Arnica Montana -- 177
Arsenicum Album -- 178-179
Aurum Metallicum -- 180-181
Baryta Carbonica -- 182-183
Bryonia -- 184-185
Calcarea Carbonica -- 186-187
Calcarea Phosphorica -- 188
Carbo Vegetabilis -- 189
Carcinosin -- 190-191
Causticum -- 192-193
Chelidonium Majus -- 194
China -- 195
Cimicifuga -- 196-197
Conium Maculatum -- 198
Cuprum Metallicum -- 199
Ferrum Metallicum -- 200
Graphites -- 201-202
Hepar Sulphuris -- 203
Ignatia -- 204-205
Iodum -- 206
Kali Bichromicum -- 207
Kali Carbonicum -- 208-209
Kali Phosphoricum -- 210-211
Kali Sulphuricum -- 212
Lachesis -- 213-214
Lilium Tigrinum -- 215
Lycopodium Clavatum -- 216-217
Meddorhinum -- 218-219
Mercurius Solubilis -- 220-221
Natrum Muriaticum -- 222-223
Natrum Sulphuricum -- 224-225
Nitric Acid -- 226-227
Nux Vomica -- 228
Opium -- 229
Phosphoric Acid -- 230-231
Phosphorus -- 232
Phytolacca Decandra -- 233
Platina -- 234
Plumbum -- 235
Psorinum -- 236-237
Pulsatilla -- 238-239
Rhus Toxicodendron -- 240
Sepia -- 241
Silica -- 242-243
Stannum Metallicum -- 244
Staphysagria -- 245-246
Sulphur -- 247-249
Syphilinum -- 250-251
Thuja -- 252-253
Tuberculinum Bovinum -- 254
-Bacillinum -- 255
Veratrum Album -- 256
Zincum -- 257

Homeopathic Books for Study -- 258
Booklets for Beginners -- 259
Glossary of Specialized Terms -- 260-261
Questions for Reflection and Discussion -- 262-265
Appendix: A Study of Kent's 'Repertory' -- 266-279
Remedy Index -- 280-282
Subject Index -- 283-285

Hamish Boyd
MB, ChB, FRCP, DCH, FFHom

Dr. Hamish Boyd qualified MB,CHB at Glasgow University in 1947.

He continued with studies in paediatrics in Glasgow and Liverpool, gaining the Diploma in Child Health. He followed this with further posts in general medicine and respiratory medicine, and obtained his MRCP (Glasgow).

He then started work as a principal in general practice, while beginning to study homoeopathy at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital. He now holds the position of Medical Superintendent and Senior Consultant at that hospital.

He is a past-President and now Dean of the British Faculty of Homoeopathy. He was elected FRCP (Glasgow) in 1977.

Reviews

Two Reviews:
1. The Homoeopath
2. Homeopathy Today

The Homoeopath
Vol.10 No.3 1990

Reviewed by:
David Curtin MB BS MFHom MCH.
It is a long time since I read a book describing itself as an introduction to homoeopathic medicine. So it was with great interest that I began to read the second edition of Dr Boyd's book.

There have been so many books written on the subject of homoeopathy in recent years, and I wondered what it will offer that has not been offered many times before.

Dr Boyd is a senior figure in the world of homoeopathic medicine and is at present Senior Consultant Physician at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital and Dean of the Faculty of Homoeopathy. His book will certainly attract attention for this reason alone.

I am sure that he has taken a keen interest in the work of prominent homoeopaths today worldwide and it is knowing this that particularly aroused my curiosity.

The book is clearly laid out and well presented. The material is divided into clearly defined chapters which make it easy to dip into.

I felt it succeeds well as an introduction to homoeopathic medicine, presenting the material simply, but at the same time leaving nothing out. I liked particularly the way in which Dr Boyd expressed the importance of utilizing the best of homoeopathic medicine and the best of orthodox medicine. He got the balance just right.

The book is more than just an introduction however. It contains also a mini materia medica, and a section on materia medica of the systems.

This will be useful in differentiating between remedies in acute conditions, and the book will therefore make a handy reference book for the busy general practitioner.

There is also an appendix containing Margaret Tyler's A Study of Kent's Repertory. This is, of course, an excellent study, but I felt that one of the weaknesses of Dr Boyd's book was that there was insufficient mention of repertory work where needed.

For example in the section on case taking and diagnosis I felt it would have been useful to show some repertory work in each of the cases rather than jumping straight from the case to the remedy, even though justification is given for each prescription.

Dr Boyd writes that when studying a remedy it is necessary to memorize as much as possible of its characteristics. This does enable one to jump straight from the case to the remedy in many instances and may have a place in acute prescribing in a busy general practice, but it is important to be aware of the limitations of this approach. It limits you to the remedies you know well.

I was pleased to find mention of the different methodologies of homoeopaths past and present. It is essential that a newcomer to homoeopathy be aware that there is not just one way of doing things.

Also a quotation from an article by Dr Foubisher in the British Homoeopathic journal 1963 concerning the danger of trying to fit all patients into types caught my attention. Many such small details made the book a most interesting read.

To summarize, I found the book to be not only a good introduction to homoeopathic medicine but also an interesting and useful book for more experienced practitioners. It will appeal especially to medical practitioners.



Homeoapthy Today
March 1991

Reviewed by Francis Treuherz, RSHom

I have dozens of introductory textbooks on homeopathy on my groaning shelves. This book is a textbook, but certainly one that shows erudition, experience, and wisdom. There is no compromise with allopathy for the sake of the neophyte.

There is no place at present for teaching about homeopathy in the normal medical school syllabus, and the interest shown by medical students reported in recent surveys is based on ignorance.

Too often, attempts are made to modify the ideas of homeopathy in an attempt to make it acceptable to allopaths. Research is carried out which suggests that there may be an action of, say, Rhus toxicodendron 6c as a named specific remedy and potency for arthritis, as if this may soften the prejudice of the old school; I believe this only serves to confuse as there are only remedies for patients.

The strength of the present book is that the style of language and presentation is such that allopaths will understand, but the principles are entirely those which we recognize as those of Hahnemann and Kent.

Two things are necessary for the successful selection of a similar remedy: a clear picture of the patient's symptoms and a comprehensive knowledge of the materia medica. These principles are laid out in categories which the conventionally trained physician or medical student will comprehend, with further references and reading lists for the classic homeopathic literature.

I imagine that since the author is the Dean of the Faculty of Homeopathy, his book is a standard work for the Faculty candidate. I can only praise it and assume that those who come to scoff will also remain to praise.

There are carefully structured opening chapters outlining what homeopathy can offer compared to conventional treatment, and the reader is referred forward to the more detailed chapters which follow.

There are succinct chapters on the unique features of homeopathic case taking and diagnosis; the preparation, prescribing, and administration of the remedy; and an over-view of research.

The systematic approach to materia medica begins with just that, suggested ways of approaching different body systems and their disease patterns. So often, this can be an area of pitfalls, but Boyd retains the whole person approach and refers to constitutional treatment all the time.

There follows a brief materia medica of 55 remedies. It bears an acknowledged debt to Gibson's Studies of Homeopathic Remedies (Beaconsfield 1986), and it is hoped that readers will have their appetites whetted for the real thing.

There are references to homeopathic gurus from other countries, Dorcsi, Eizayaga, Koehler, Vithoulkas, as well as references to the classics like Clarke.

There is a welcome reprint of Margaret Tyler's inimitable Study of Kent's Repertory. The book is indexed with remedies and subjects also.

Gone is the somewhat humble and apologetic air of the first edition of this book. Homeopathy can stand on its own feet not as an alternative but the alternative medicine as Margery Blackie had it.

It is a book to be recommended to all other alternative practitioners.