Fungi - Kingdom Fungi

Fungi - Kingdom Fungi

  • Frans Vermeulen

VER122

$109.00

Overview

Spectrum Materia Medica Volume 2

Encompassing over 100 remedies, the systems, symptoms and signatures of Fungi, Yeasts, Molds, and Lichens are revealed by Vermeulen in his latest endeavor.

Netherlands
785pp Hb
ISBN 978-90-76189-20-8

Details

Spectrum Fungi brings to light 109 remedies in the Kingdom, which includes fungi, moulds, yeasts and lichens.

The book contains taxonomical maps, keynotes, materia medica, provings, rubrics, tables of relationships, sensations and expressions and even recipes.

From the Book

INTRODUCTION

Fungi and fungal diseases
Interest in fungi is mushrooming. Increasingly explored by mycologists, medical scientists, gourmets, folklorists, thrill-seeking adventurers, and mind-expansionists alike, this often-overlooked group of organisms provides us with food, drink, valuable medicines, industrial chemicals, recreational drugs, and unsurpassed marvels of nature.

Some even take care of our radioactive waste. The role of fungi in evolutionary processes is now better understood and their value as recyclers and symbionts better appreciated.

Symbiotically associated with plant roots, fungi distribute essential nutrients, thereby transforming inhospitable environments into hospitable ones and enabling plants to settle and grow. Their role in the evolution of Mother Earth is now believed to have been the guidance of water-inhabiting algae onto dry land.

By entering into a coalition with algal partners and allowing them to be dominant these consortiums evolved into land plants. It is certainly no co-incidence that 95% of today's land plants have symbiotic fungi in their roots. [Most of the 5% of plants that lack persistent fungal symbionts have returned to the water or never left it; they are aquatic plants.]

However, in their role as recycling transformers fungi are not always to our advantage or convenience. We are not pleased with the increasing incidence of medical mycoses and of fungal diseases of livestock and crops.

Although regarded as the villains of the piece, fungi merely play their part. Being essentially saprophytes [saprobes] — recycling dead or decaying material — fungi, then termed "opportunists," produce systemic and subcutaneous mycoses.

During the last 50 years or so saprobes "suddenly have become parasitic and pathogenic," which is probably due to the rapid development of antibacterial, antineoplastic and immunosuppressive drugs.

"A dramatic change in the epidemiology of infectious diseases has taken place with the advent of new chemotherapeutic agents, new immunosuppressive agents, organ transplantation, parenteral alimentation, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and advanced surgical techniques. In this new scenario, fungal infections have emerged as a critical issue in the compromised host." [www.doctorfungus.com]

In unhealthy functioning ecosystems fungus-plant interactions result in disease. Disruption of human immune systems has similar damaging consequences.

The maintenance of agricultural monocultures with large-scale use of fertilizers and pesticides as well as the breeding of new crop varieties by genetic manipulation has resulted in significantly decreased resistance of crops to fungal infestation, which, in turn, causes a steep rise in both mycotoxin levels and spore production.

A major cause of hypersensitivity [allergic] reactions, both out and indoors the air is filled with spores and other fungal elements. In addition, eczema, chronic digestive problems, acute diarrhoea, and irritable bowel syndrome have all been associated with the ingestion of the products of mould fungi.

In nature much of the effort of fungi goes into undoing the human disruptions of ecosystems. For undoing the disruptions of human immune systems likewise fungi can be employed, to which the ancient history of the use of medicinal fungi as immunostimulants in the Far East bears adequate witness.

Fungal remedies
The various repertories and homeopathic encyclopaedias list 72 names of fungal remedies [fungal compounds included].

Of these, 32 fungi are represented in the abbreviation lists by nothing more than a name, i.e. there are no symptoms, whilst of the remaining 40 fungi 27 have less than twenty symptoms.

It leaves us with 13 fungi we might possibly come across when repertorizing. Yet, even that number does not reflect the actual situation.

Our understanding of the entire kingdom is based in essence on a total of three fungi: Agaricus, Bovista, and Claviceps [Secale], with a few more having a place in the background: Psilocybe, Ustilago, Sticta, Polyporus officinalis, Candida albicans, and the fungal compounds Alcoholus and Penicillinum.

This well-known trio supplies the rudiments, the basics, the ABC of the homeopathic perception of the kingdom. One may safely assume that such a foundation is too narrow.

To broaden the horizons — admittedly, my own in the first place — I have spent some years studying the biology of fungi and collecting evidence from the dusty corners of homeopathy. All gathered material I have put together to come to a working hypothesis designed to enable pattern recognition.

Emphasis is placed on the biological features of the individual fungus, based on the conviction that similarity is a matter of analogy between the nature of the substance and the nature of the person. Defining homeopathy as a process of cause and effect ["What can cause can cure"] seems to me too limited and too limiting.

Keys
The process of researching and dusting has resulted in keys for the individual fungi. The keys are combinations of mycological and toxicological data, medicinal use, culinary delights, fungal lore, thematic concepts, peculiar properties, and homeopathic symptoms [where available].

The keys are meant as potential indications; they cannot be conclusive since clinical veri-fication is lacking for most of the 109 fungi and fungal compounds included in Spectrum.

As already stated 32 have an abbreviation only; 27 have twenty or less symptoms, and 37 are new.

Dealing with the Kingdom Fungi, Volume 2 of Spectrum presents an orientation in this fascinating but arcane kingdom. It includes drug pictures, rudimentary or more complete, with a range of analogous information [signatures] as its points of departure.

The kingdom Monera [including the kingdom-less viruses] has been discussed in Volume 1; the remaining kingdoms - protists, plants, animals, elements - will be presented in subsequent volumes of Spectrum.

Believing is seeing
The doubting Thomas wanted to see first and then believe, as do some homeopathic practitioners. Such a concept is like the snake that bites its own tail: a vicious circle.

That it is all about perspective is illustrated by Andrew Weil's story "Believing is Seeing." Replace the words 'mushroom' or 'morel' in the story by the word 'remedy,' and see what you see...

Mushroom hunting can teach us a lot about the larger world. A common experience of mushroom hunters is not being able to see a particular mushroom when they first try to collect it.

It's not a question of visual acuity, but of pattern recognition.

One woman wanted to find morels. She'd been told they grew in her area, but nobody would show her exactly where, and she had never seen one in the flesh. So finally she went out by herself to the woods and spent an entire morning looking, without finding a single morel.

In frustration she got down on her hands and knees and began sifting through last year's leaves. Just as she was about to give up, she saw one morel a few inches away, and picked it. Clutching it triumphantly, she looked up and saw hundreds of them scattered through the woods in all directions.

A useful lesson can be drawn from this: that our brain acts as a filter, screening out what it doesn't consider significant. A certain "key" has to be in place before our brain can say quot;Aha!quot; and recognize something.

And of course, what we recognize has real consequences. In this case, the person who can see the morels gets to put them in the basket and take them home to eat.

The larger principle is that what we experience is determined by what we are able to perceive. It leads me to believe that we should be willing to accept other people's experiences — for instance, telepathy or pre-recognition -\— or at least consider that they have validity, even though we do not share them. Otherwise we could live in a forest full of morels and never see them.
[Cited in David Arora, All That the Rain Promises and More … ]

Acknowledgements
Many thanks to everyone for helping in the collection of data, for proof-reading, editing, correcting and translating; for being patient; for making difficult subjects lighter to digest and easy ones more complicated; for giving opinions; for unravelling national or local customs; for reading the Introduction, and for Maud and Claire.
Frans Vermeulen,
Molkom, Sweden,
24 April, 2006

Contents

Introduction -- xxix
Fungi and fungal diseases -- xxix
Fungal remedies -- xxx
Keys -- xxxi
Enigmatic species -- xxxi
Believing is Seeing -- xxxiii
Acknowledgements -- xxxiii
Classification Kingdom Fungi -- xxxiv - xlvii
Fungal taxonomy -- xlvii
Biology of Fungi -- xlviii --
Differences with plants -- xlviii
Expansion and penetration -- xlix
Reproduction -- l
Spores -- lii
Metabolism -- lii
Light -- liv
Growing conditions -- lv
Rapidity -- lv
Fungal frigidity -- lv
Constant activity to maintain intimate relationship with environment -- lvi
Relationship to immediate environment - settling down -- lvii
Strength and survival -- lix
Flexibility -- lxi
Colonizers -- lxiii
Food and alcohol -- lxv
Alcohol and urine -- lxvi
Pharmaceuticals -- lxvii
Nutritional value -- lxvii
Fungophobia -- lxviii
Fungophobal prose and poetry -- lxx
Embodiment of bad properties -- lxxii
Fungal lore -- lxxiii
Fungophilia -- lxxv
Mushrooms of immortality -- lxxvi
Sacred mushrooms -- lxxvii
India -- lxxvii
Crossing bridges -- lxxviii
Mediators -- lxxx
Dangers of fungi -- lxxx
Antidotes -- lxxxiii
Nothing ventured, nothing gained -- lxxxiv
Like a child -- lxxxv
Mycotoxins -- lxxxviii
Fungal infections -- xci
Allergenic fungi -- xcii
Spores as allergens -- xcii
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis -- xciv
Clinical features -- xciv
Tuberculosis -- xcv
Common symptoms of three fungal remedies -- xcvii
Incentives -- c
Signatures/ Themes of fungi -- ci
Macroscopic fleshy fungi -- ci
Moulds -- cii
Parasitic - endophytic fungi -- cii
Wood-inhabiting fungi -- ciii
Yeasts -- ciii
Dimorphic fungi -- civ

ORDER LYCOPERDALES -- 3
Family Lycoperdaceae -- 3
Bovista -- 3
Puffballs -- 5
Umbilical cord -- 7
Bleeding -- 8
Rupture -- 8
Future -- 9
Clinical manifestations -- 10
Lycoperdonosis -- 11
Therapeutics -- 11 --
Aluminium -- 12
Materia Medica -- 13

ORDER PHALLALES -- 19
Family Phallaceae -- 19
Phallus impudicus – 19
Special features -- 20
Speed and force -- 20
Stench -- 20
Impudicity -- 22
Clinical manifestations -- 24
Ingredients of stench -- 24
Therapeutics -- 25
Aphrodisiac -- 26
Materia Medica -- 27

ORDER SCLERODERMATALES -- 29
Family Sclerodermaceae -- 29
Scleroderma citrinus -- 29 --
Clinical manifestations -- 30

ORDER AGARICALES -- 33
Family Agaricaceae -- 33
Agaricus bisporus -- 33
Clinical manifestations -- 34
Agaricus blazei -- 36
History -- 37
Growth requirements -- 38
Benzoic acid -- 38 --
Beta-glucans -- 39
Reduction of adverse effects of orthodox cancer treatment -- 40
Homeostasis -- 41
Side effects -- 41
Homeopathy -- 42
Agaricus campestris -- 43
Heavy metals -- 43
Materia Medica -- 44
Family Amanitaceae -- 45
Amanitas -- 45
Agaricus citrinus
[Amanita citrina] -- 45
Clinical manifestations -- 46
Toads and toadstools -- 46
Materia Medica -- 47
Agaricus gemmata
[see Agaricus procerus] -- 115
Agaricus muscarius
[Amanita muscaria] -- 48
Clinical manifestations -- 49
Key components -- 51
Two sides -- 51
Macropsia -- 52
Micropsia -- 53
Increased strength - battle frenzy -- 54
Violence or non-violence -- 56
Adversity changed into triumph -- 57
Enterprising -- 59
Sense of danger -- 61
Death-dreamer -- 61
Fly-induced activity -- 62
Mutual benefit -- 63
Agaricus pantherinus
[Amanita pantherina] 65
Amanitas containing ibotenic acid/muscimol -- 65
Clinical manifestations -- 66
Ibotenic acid/ muscimol -- 68
Experiment -- 69
[Un]reality -- 71
Materia Medica -- 72
Agaricus phalloides
[Amanita phalloides] 74
Clinical manifestations -- 75
Two types -- 76
Poisoning cases -- 76
Materia Medica -- 77
Agaricus rubescens
[Amanita rubescens] -- 80
Clinical manifestations -- 80
Agaricus vernus
[Amanita verna] -- 81
Clinical manifestations -- 82
Muscarinum -- 86
Clinical manifestations – 86

PSL - SLUDGE -- 87
Materia Medica -- 89
Family Coprinaceae -- 92
Agaricus campanulatus
[Panaeolus campanulatus] -- 92
Dung -- 93
Clinical manifestations -- 94
Laughing mushrooms -- 94
Symptoms -- 95
More hilarity -- 95
Out of tune with reality -- 97
Materia Medica -- 98
Coprinus atramentarius -- 100
Special features -- 100
Autolysis -- 101
Fragility -- 101
Ink -- 101
Attila the Hun -- 101
Challenging Coprinus -- 102
Cooked or uncooked -- 103
Clinical manifestations -- 104
Symptoms
[after alcohol] 105
Materia Medica -- 106
Family Cortinariaceae -- 108
Cortinarius orellanus -- 108
Clinical manifestations -- 109
Aluminium -- 110
Gymnopilus spectabilis -- 111
Clinical manifestations -- 111
Exhilaration -- 114
Family Lepiotaceae -- 115
Agaricus procerus
[Macrolepiota procera] -- 115
Materia Medica -- 115
Look-alikes -- 116
Chlorophyllum molybdites -- 119
Clinical manifestations -- 120
Family Paxillaceae -- 122
Paxillus involutus -- 122
Clinical manifestations -- 122
Family Russulaceae -- 124
Agaricus emeticus
[Russula emetica] -- 124
Brittle -- 125
Clinical manifestations -- 125
Materia Medica -- 125
Russula foetens -- 128
Clinical manifestations -- 128
Materia Medica -- 128
Family Strophariaceae -- 130
Agaricus semiglobatus
[Stropharia semiglobata] -- 130
Identification -- 130
Materia Medica -- 131
Agaricus stercorarius
[Stropharia stercoraria] -- 132
Materia Medica -- 133
Psilocybe caerulescens -- 135
Clinical manifestations -- 136
Doom -- 137
Materia Medica -- 138
Psilocybe semilanceata -- 145
Clinical manifestations -- 146
Nature awareness -- 148
Focus -- 148
Travels in the universe of the soul -- 149
Poisoning case -- 151
Materia Medica -- 154
Family Tricholomataceae -- 158
Armillaria mellea -- 158
Parasitic symbiont -- 159
Shoestrings -- 160
Bioluminescence -- 160
Therapeutics -- 161
Expansionism -- 163
Lentinula edodes
[Shiitake] -- 164
Therapeutics -- 165
Clinical manifestations -- 168
Materia Medica -- 170
Omphalotus illudens
[Jack O’Lantern mushroom] -- 174
Ghosts and moon nights -- 175
Clinical manifestations -- 175
Cancer -- 176 --
Pleurotus ostreatus
[Oyster Mushroom] -- 178
Preying on worms -- 179
Cholesterol -- 179
Haemopoiesis - haemolysis -- 180
Therapeutics -- 181
Tricholoma spp. -- 182
Tricholoma pardinum -- 182 --
Tricholoma sejunctum -- 182
Tricholoma sulphureum -- 183
Tricholoma pessundatum -- 183 --
Tricholoma muscarium -- 184
Tricholomic acid -- 185 --
Tricholoma matsutake -- 185

ORDER APHYLLOPHORALES
[POLYPORALES] -- 188
Family Ganodermataceae -- 188 --
Ganoderma lucidum
[Reishi] -- 188
Longevity -- 189
Mystery and secrecy -- 191
Transformation -- 191
Therapeutics -- 193
Active constituents -- 195
Clinical manifestations -- 197
Family Polyporaceae -- 199
Polypores -- 199
Medical merits -- 200
Polyporus officinalis
[Fomitopsis officinalis] -- 202
History -- 203
Therapeutics -- 204
Materia Medica -- 205
Agaricicum acidum
[Agaricin] -- 208
Materia Medica -- 208
Polyporus pinicola
[Fomitopsis pinicola]209
Therapeutics -- 210
Materia Medica -- 210
Grifola frondosa -- 213
Therapeutics -- 214
Inonotus obliquus -- 216
Therapeutics -- 217
Birch - beginning and end -- 218
Piptoporus betulinus -- 220
Deathbed -- 221
Therapeutics -- 221
Pycnoporus sanguineus -- 223
Therapeutics -- 223
Materia Medica -- 224
Trametes versicolor -- 232
Trametes
[syn. Boletus] suaveolens -- 233
Therapeutics -- 234

ORDER BOLETALES -- 236
Family Boletaceae -- 236
Boletus edulis -- 236
King -- 237
Boletivores -- 239
Clinical manifestations -- 240
Therapeutics -- 241
Boletus luridus -- 242
Materia Medica -- 242
Boletus satanas -- 244
Clinical manifestations -- 244
Materia Medica -- 245
Lenz -- 247
Bolete boldness -- 248

ORDER CANTHARELLALES -- 252
Family Cantharellaceae -- 252
Cantharellus cibarius -- 252
Special features -- 253
Canthaxanthin -- 254

ORDER HYMENOCHAETALES -- 256
Family Hymenochaetaceae -- 256
Phellinus nigricans -- 256
Special features -- 257

ORDER AURICULARIALES -- 258
Family Auriculariaceae -- 258
Auricularia polytricha / auricula -- 258
Clinical features -- 259 --
Jew’s Ear -- 260

ORDER TREMELLALES -- 262
Family Filobasidiaceae -- 262
Cryptococcus neoformans -- 262
Cryptococcosis -- 264
CNS cryptococcosis -- 264
Clinical manifestations -- 266
Dimorphism -- 267
Pityrosporum orbiculare -- 268
Pityriasis -- 269
Seborrhoea and dandruff -- 269
Atopic eczema / dermatitis -- 271
Psorinum or Melitagrinum? -- 272
Family Tremellaceae -- 275
Tremella fuciformis -- 275
Traditional and medical use -- 276

ORDER USTILAGINALES -- 278
Family Sporidiobolaceae
[Sporobolomycetaceae] -- 278
Sporobolomyces -- 278
Features of the genus Sporobolomyces -- 278
Sporobolomyces roseus -- 279
Sprobolomyces salmonicolor -- 280
Features -- 280
Family Ustilaginaceae -- 281
Ustilago maydis -- 281
Smuts or Dust-Brands -- 283
Therapeutics -- 284
Materia Medica -- 285
Cases -- 291

SUBPHYLUM ASCOMYCOTA
[Sac Fungi] -- 295
Series Unitunicatae-Operculatae – 295

ORDER PEZIZALES -- 295
Family Discinaceae
[Helvellaceae] -- 295
Gyromitra esculenta -- 296
Toxins -- 297
Clinical effects -- 297
Case reports -- 299
Neurotoxicity -- 301
Materia Medica -- 302
Family Morchellaceae -- 305
Morchella esculenta -- 305
Concealment and glory -- 306
Clinical manifestations -- 307
Family Tuberaceae -- 308
Tuber melanosporum -- 308
Features of truffles -- 308
Truffle species -- 309
Truffle hunters -- 310
Pheromones -- 311
Dimethyl sulfide -- 313
Le Tartuffe -- 314
Series Unitunicatae-Inoperculatae – 316

ORDER CLAVICIPITALES -- 316
Family Clavicipitaceae -- 316
Claviceps -- 316
Features of the genus Claviceps 317
Secale cornutum
[Claviceps purpurea] -- 318
History -- 319
Possession - holy or hellish -- 320
Ergotism -- 321
Medically induced ergotism -- 323
Food-borne ergotism -- 324
Adverse effects -- 325
Ergotamine -- 325
Demeter -- 326
Wolves -- 328
Demeter: Nurturer and Mother 330
Dangerous world -- 331
Kent’s picture of Secale -- 332
Perils of procreation
[Cases] -- 332
Ergotinum -- 336
Materia Medica -- 336
Clinical picture -- 337
Hyderginum -- 339
Dementia -- 339
Cognitive impairment -- 341
Concept -- 342
LSD -- 344
Origin -- 344
First self-experiment by a psychiatrist -- 346
Therapy -- 348
Main therapeutic applications349
Adverse reactions -- 349
Bliss -- 352
Flashbacks -- 352
Visual or visionary perception -- 353
Like a child -- 355
Materia Medica -- 356
Methysergidum -- 366
Adverse reactions -- 367
Materia Medica -- 369
Cordyceps -- 371
Features of the genus Cordyceps -- 371
Species -- 371
Cordyceps militaris -- 372
Cordyceps sinensis -- 374
Therapeutics -- 374
Traditional -- 374
Performance -- 374
Pulmonary disorders -- 375
Studies -- 377
Constituents -- 377
Adverse effects -- 378
Materia Medica -- 378
Cyclosporinum -- 379
Metamorphosis -- 379
Immunosuppression -- 382
Adverse reactions -- 382
Materia Medica -- 383
Neotyphodium lolii -- 392
Features of the genus -- 392
Toxins -- 393
Moves, shakes & staggers -- 393
Reproduction and vasoconstriction -- 395
Sleepygrass and
drunken horse grass -- 395
Lolium temulentum -- 397
Plant -- 397
Poisoning -- 397
Fungus in Lolium -- 399
Clinical manifestations 400
Materia Medica -- 401
Cases -- 406
First case -- 406
Second case -- 409
Signatures -- 410
Hands On, Hands Off -- 412

ORDER HYPOCREALES -- 413
Family Hypocreaceae -- 413
Fusarium -- 413
Features of the genus Fusarium -- 413
Fusarium mycotoxins -- 415
History -- 415
Toxins -- 415
Clinical manifestations -- 416
Occurrence -- 417
Fusarium graminearum -- 418
Protein -- 418
Growth -- 419
Sex -- 420
Oestrogenic syndrome -- 420
Similarities with DES -- 422
Fusarium oxysporum -- 425
Parasite -- 425
Requirements -- 425
Fusariosis -- 426
Trauma -- 426
Symptoms -- 426
Disseminated infection -- 426
Forma specialis and bio-bombing -- 428
Fusarium sporotrichioides -- 430
Fusarium mycotoxicosis -- 430
Alimentary Toxic Aleukia -- 432
Yellow Rain -- 435
Clinical manifestations -- 436
Family Nectria -- 438
Nectria dittisima
[Nectrianinum] -- 438
Materia Medica -- 439

ORDER LEOTIALES -- 441
Family Sclerotiniaceae -- 441
Botrytis cinerea -- 441
Special features -- 442
Noble rot -- 443
Allergy -- 443

ORDER MICROASCALES -- 445
Family Microascaceae -- 445
Pseudallescheria boydii
[Acladium castellani] -- 445
Pseudalleschiasis -- 446

ORDER SORDARIALES -- 449
Family Lasiosphaeriaceae
[Arthrinium arundinis] -- 449 --
Intoxication -- 449
Series: Prototunicatae – 451

ORDER EUROTIALES -- 451
Family Trichocomaceae -- 452
Aspergillus -- 452
Features of the genus Aspergillus 452
Mycotoxins -- 453
Aspergillus bronchialis -- 455
Aspergillus candidus -- 455
Kojic acid -- 456
Aspergillus flavus -- 457
Growing conditions -- 458
Aflatoxins -- 458
Aspergillus fumigatus -- 462
Infection -- 462
Aspergillosis -- 463
Fumagillin -- 465
Aspergillus niger -- 466
Copper -- 467
Infection -- 467
Materia Medica -- 467
Penicillium -- 469
Features of the genus Penicillium 469
Allergies -- 470
The king and queen of psora -- 474
Anaphylactic shock -- 474
Other adverse reactions -- 475
Penicilliosis -- 475
Penicillium camemberti -- 476
Mycotoxins -- 476
Penicillium chrysogenum -- 477
Mycotoxins -- 477
Penicillium cyclopium -- 478
Mycotoxins -- 478
Penicillium expansum -- 480
Mycotoxins -- 481
Materia Medica -- 481
Penicillium griseum -- 483
Mycotoxins -- 483
Penicillium griseofulvum -- 483
Griseofulvin -- 484
Adverse reactions -- 484
Penicillium notatum -- 486
Mycotoxins -- 486
Penicillium piceum -- 486
Penicillium roqueforti -- 487
Mycotoxins -- 488
Effects -- 488
Penicillinum
[Benzylpenicillin Sodium] -- 490
Adverse reactions -- 490
Materia Medica -- 491

ORDER ONYGENALES -- 496
Family Arthrodermataceae -- 496
Trichophyton -- 496
Features of the genus Trichophyton -- 496
Ringworm -- 497
History -- 498
Manifestations -- 500
ID Reaction -- 502
Rubrics in Fungal Infections -- 502
Constitutional state -- 503
Cats and dogs -- 504
Exclusion -- 505
Skin -- 506
Favus. -- 508
Trichophyton depressum -- 510
Kerion -- 510
Trichophyton persearum
[= persicolor] -- 511
Trichophyton rubrum -- 512
Trichophyton tonsurans -- 513
Ringworm -- 514
Miasm -- 514
Proving -- 515
Dreams -- 515
Themes -- 517
Family Onygenaceae -- 519
Blastomyces dermatitidis -- 519
Blastomycosis -- 520
Clinical forms -- 520
Coccidioides immites -- 522
Coccidioidomycosis -- 523
Clinical forms -- 524
Geomyces pannorum
[Aleurisma lugdunense] -- 527
Skin infections -- 528
Histoplasma capsulatum -- 529
Bats and starlings -- 530
Histoplasmosis -- 530
Clinical forms -- 531
Symptoms -- 532
Paracoccidioides brasiliensis -- 534
Paracoccidioidomycosis -- 535

ORDER OPHIOSTOMATALES -- 537
Sporothrix schenckii -- 537
Sporotrichosis -- 538
Cutaneous sporotrichosis -- 538
Lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis -- 539
Pulmonary sporotrichosis -- 540 --
Sporotrichosis arthritis -- 540 --
Disseminated sporotrichosis -- 541
Syphilitic miasm -- 541
Series Bitunicatae – 543

ORDER DOTHIDEALES -- 543
Family Dematiaceae -- 543
Stachybotrys chartarum -- 543
History -- 544
Stachybotryotoxicosis -- 545
Family Dothioraceae -- 547
Aureobasidium pullulans -- 547
Allergen -- 548
Hortaea werneckii
[Cladosporium metanigrum] -- 550
Dermatomycosis -- 551
Family Pleosporaceae -- 552
Alternaria alternata -- 552
Toxins -- 553
Pathogenicity -- 553
Allergies -- 554

ORDER SACCHAROMYCETALES
[ENDOMYCETALES] -- 555
Family Ascoideaceae -- 555
Candida -- 555
Features of the genus Candida -- 555
Candida albicans -- 556
Nomenclature -- 557
Candidiasis -- 557
Manifestations -- 558
Types of Candidiasis of skin and mucosa -- 558
Types of Invasive Candidiasis -- 560
Thrush -- 562
Candida Hypersensitivity Syndrome -- 564
Symptoms -- 565
Allergies -- 566
Psychological profile -- 567
Die-off reactions -- 569
Materia Medica -- 572
Key components -- 572
Clinical symptoms -- 575
Candida kefyr -- 578
Candida parapsilosis -- 578
Clinical features -- 579
Materia Medica -- 579
Family Saccharomycetadeae -- 582
Kloeckera apiculata -- 582
Family Saccharomycetaceae -- 584
Kluyveromyces marxianus -- 584
Lactose - lactase -- 585
Lactose intolerance -- 585
Kefir -- 586
Saccharomyces -- 588
Features of the genus -- 588
Saccharomyces carlsbergensis -- 589
Materia Medica Lager Beer -- 590
Lager in the Materia Medica -- 592
Saccharomyces cerevisiae -- 594
Therapeutics -- 595
Tumours -- 597
Symbolism -- 598
Workaholism -- 600
Dionysus -- 601
Yeast allergies and Crohn’s disease -- 604
Materia Medica -- 605
Cases -- 610
Alcoholus -- 616
Pharmacokinetics -- 617
Inebriation -- 618
Jekyll and Hide -- 619
Alcoholism -- 621
Eight kinds of drunkards -- 623
Deficiencies due to alcoholism 624
Toxic disorders due to alcoholism -- 626
Delirium tremens -- 627
Hallucinations -- 631
Alcohol and sex -- 632
Social interaction -- 633
Alcohol drug picture -- 635
Materia Medica -- 640
Alcoholus and fungi -- 649
Ignis Alcoholis -- 650
Ignis in the Kingdom Fungi? -- 650
Conjunction of opposites -- 651
Symbolism of fire -- 652
Materia Medica -- 653
Ignis compared with
Agaricus, Bovista and Secale -- 659

PHYLLUM ZYGOMYCOTA -- 661
ORDER MUCORALES -- 662
Family Mucoraceae -- 662
Mucor mucedo -- 662
Sexual rendezvous -- 664
Clinical features -- 664
Materia Medica -- 665
Mucor cum Aspergillus cum Penicillium -- 667
Rhizopus nigricans
[Rhizopus stolonifer] -- 670
Clinical features -- 671

SUBPHYLUM LICHENES -- 672
Lichens -- 673
Partnership or rulership -- 673
Habitat -- 675
Advance or retreat -- 676
Growth forms -- 676
Water -- 677
Brittleness -- 678
Reproduction -- 678
Uses -- 679
Lungs of the earth -- 679
Usnic acid -- 680
Signatures/ themes of lichens -- 682

ORDER LECANORALES -- 683
Family Cladoniaceae -- 683
Cladonia pyxidata – 683

Materia Medica -- 684
Cladonia rangiferina -- 687
Traditional use -- 688
Materia Medica -- 688
Themes -- 688
Family Parmeliaceae -- 699
Cetraria islandica -- 699
Therapeutics -- 700
Acid rain and heavy metals -- 701
Usnea barbata -- 704
Traditional use -- 704
Supplements and therapeutics -- 705
Materia Medica -- 705

ORDER PELTIGERALES -- 707
Family Lobariaceae -- 707
Sticta -- 707
Traditional use -- 708
Materia Medica -- 708
Symptoms -- 709
Housemaid’s knee and
domestic slaves -- 712

Addendum-Proving
AGARICUS PHALLOIDES -- 715

Bibliography and References -- 723
Keys to the Fungi
and Fungal Compounds -- 727
Metals, Minerals and Fungi
[Table showing affinities] 747
Pathology and Fungi -- 749
Trees and Fungi -- 752
Miasms and Fungi -- 753
Insects and Fungi -- 754
Recipes -- 755
Glossary -- 761
Index -- 771
About the Author -- 783

Frans Vermeulen

(1948 - )

Frans Vermeulen was born in July, 1948 in Den Helder, Holland. He graduated from teachers training college in 1970. He worked as a schoolteacher until 1978 and had already started to study homeopathy at Stichting Klassieke Homeopathie in Den Haag. He continued to study homeopathy until 1983 although he had been running his practice since 1979.

Frans started to translate homeopathic books for work and pleasure. Between 1983 and 1996 he translated English and German homeopathic books, including Kent, Allen, Hering, Boericke, Borland, Tyler, Vithoulkas, Voegeli, Whitmont, Miles, Morgan and Koehler.

In 1985 he wrote 'Kindertypes in Homoeopathie' (Children's Types in Homoeopathy), based on his experiences as both a teacher and a homoeopath.

In 1990 he was appointed managing director, teacher, and administrator of 'The School of Homeopathy' in Holland. In 1992 he wrote 'Synoptic Materia Medica 1' which originally emerged from remedy summaries made for the students in Holland, Ireland and Finland.

He followed this one up with the 'Concordant Materia Medica' published in 1994. Followed by a second edition of the Concordant, including Hering's Guiding Symptoms in 1997; a third edition was printed in 2000.

Out of his special interest in the small remedies, Frans wrote 'Synoptic Materia Medica 2'. In the completely revised edition of Synoptic 1, entitled 'Prisma', he introduces us to data from numerous non-homoeopathic sources as both reference material for the homoeopathic materia medica and as the source of potential symptoms. The significance and potential of such external data has been the subject of his numerous seminars in Europe, Israel and Australia.

Reviews

The Materia Medica of Fungi is as elusive and mysterious as the fungi themselves.

The repertories list 72 fungi, of which 27 have less than 20 symptoms; 40 exist in name only, and perhaps 13 might appear in a repertorization. Our knowledge, themes and signatures have to date come from the alphabet of Agaricus, Bovista and Claviceps [Secale].

In The Hollow Men T. S. Eliot wrote:

Between the idea
And the reality,
Between the motion
And the act
Falls the Shadow

This is where we find the fungi. They are the critical link in the biological cycle of life and death. They exist in the penumbra, of our fields and forests; our homes and rafters; our literature and folklore; our medicines and drugs; our fridges and foodstores; our living and dying.

In Spectrum Fungi we are led ineluctably down the road of excess, to a palace of homeopathic wisdom. We begin to understand the evolutionary role of fungi in plant life, as in Monera we learnt that bacteria form the engine of human evolution.

We walk in the shadows of the transformative nature of the fungi, without which we should be forever swamped in the unrotting debris of our own making. As fungi deliquesce our solid flesh, fertilising the waiting earth and delivering us back to the silent depths, so they also transubstantiate the grape into wine and the flour into bread.

With speed and strength, the fungi penetrate, like an invisible fifth column through the soil of our being, the Psora of our materia medica, hydra-headed, bizarre, unexpected, infiltrating, colonizing, absorbing and decomposing. Sinister? Infinitely so, in their hidden power.

This book contains all the fascinating details you need to make a prescription in this strange, chameleon-like kingdom. Fungi, Moulds, Yeasts, Lichens. They are all here:

~ some as well-known drugs ~ Cyclosporin, Penicillin

~ some as the scourge of lung diseases ~ Aspergillus

~ some you love to eat and drink ~ Camembert, Roquefort, Beer, Alcoholus, Lager, Quorn, Agaricus campestris, Cantharellus, Bovista

~ and some to blow your mind ~ LSD and Psilocybe.

Vermeulen's library of books about fungi expanded from one single book to 80 during the course of his research. As the homeopathic materia medica of fungi is far from complete, most of the information is synthesized from other sources.

In the past, the fungi have been grouped into the Kingdom Plantae, and sometimes as 'excrescences of the earth!' Now, however, particularly with the means of DNA testing, it is important that these organisms, and also the fungus-like moulds and yeasts, take their place in their own Kingdom. We must desist from making any comparison between the plants and fungi.

Much of the classification used in homeopathy is incorrect, and for this book, and to be continued throughout the coming Spectrum Volumes on Plants, Frans has adopted the current standards.

As well as the extant information available to the homeopathic world on Fungi, Yeasts and Lichens, the book, hardcovered and Fly Agaric red, contains a Glossary to help you through the sometimes arcane terminology.

Other useful information, all placed at the back of the book, makes connections between fungi and minerals; fungi and pathology; fungi and trees and fungi and insects. There is the usual extensive index, a sprinkling of black and white drawings and a few recipes to whet your taste buds. The book leaves enough space for your own important jottings.

Fungi, the second book in the Spectrum Materia Medica series, continues the fastidious research and production standards that we expect of Emryss Publishers. As well as being a valuable materia medica, it also makes fascinating reading.

From:
Emryss Publishers
Reprinted by permission