Expanded Works on Nash

Expanded Works on Nash

  • E.B. Nash, MD

NAS105

$18.00

Overview

Nash hoped that if one read any or all of this book, and experimented along the lines indicated; then one would be irresistibly led to give Homeopathy a large place in one's confidence and practice.
India
962 pp hb

Contents

Abrot. -- 1
Abies-n. -- 1
Acal. -- 1
Acet-ac. -- 1
Acon. -- 1-13
Aesc. -- 14-15
Aeth. -- 16
Agar. -- 17-18
Agn. -- 19
Ail. -- 19
Aloe -- 22-23
Alumn. -- 24
Alum. -- 25-27
Ambr. -- 28
Am-c. -- 29
Am-m. -- 30-31
Aml-n. -- 32
Anac. -- 32-35
Ang. -- 36
Anthr. -- 36
Ant-c. -- 36-40
Ant-t. -- 41-49
Apis -- 50-63
Apoc. -- 64
Apom. -- 64
All-c. -- 20-21
Aral. -- 64
Aran. -- 64
Arg-m. -- 65
Arg-n. -- 65-71
Arn. -- 72-78
Ars. -- 79-103
Arum-t. -- 104-106
Asaf. -- 107
Asar. -- 108
Aspar. -- 108
Astac. -- 108
Aur. -- 108-115
Aur-m-n. -- 116
Bad. -- 117
Bapt. -- 117-124
Bar-ac. -- 125
Bar-c. -- 126-128
Bell. -- 129-139
Benz-ac. -- 140
Berb. -- 141-142
Bism. -- 143
Borax veneta -- 144-146
Bov. -- 147
Bromine -- 147
Bry. -- 148-161
Cact. -- 162-163
Calad. -- 164
Calc-f. -- 164
Calcarea hypophosphorica -- 164
Calc-s. -- 183
Camph. -- 184-185
Cann-I -- 186
Cann-s. -- 187-188
Canth. -- 189-193
Caps. -- 194-195
Carb-an. -- 196
Carb-v. -- 196-207
Carb-ac. -- 208
Card-m. -- 209
Cast-eq. -- 210
Cast. -- 210
Caul. -- 210
Caust. -- 211-223
Cean. -- 224
Cedr. -- 224
Cham. -- 224-231
Chel. -- 232-235
Chen-a. -- 236
Chim. -- 237
Chin. -- 238-253
Chin-s. -- 254
Chlor. -- 254
Cic. -- 254-255
Cimx. -- 256
Cimic. -- 257-258
Cina -- 259-265
Cinnb. -- 266
Cinnm. -- 266
Calcarea ostrearum -- 165-180
Calc-p. -- 181-182
Clem. -- 266
Cob. -- 267
Cocc. -- 267-272
Coc-c. -- 273
Coff. -- 274-276
Colch. -- 277-280
Coll. -- 281
Coloc. -- 282-285
Com. -- 286
Con. -- 287-291
Conv. -- 292
Cop. -- 293
Cor-r. -- 294
Croc. -- 295-296
Crot-h. -- 297
Crot-t. -- 298-299
Cub. -- 300
Cupr. -- 300-302
Cycl. -- 303
Dig. -- 303-314
Dios. -- 315
Dol. -- 315
Dros. -- 315-316
Dub. -- 317
Dulc. -- 318-321
Epiph. -- 322
Equis. -- 322
Erig. -- 323
Eup-per. -- 323-325
Eup-pur. -- 326
Euphr. -- 327
Ferr-i. -- 328
Ferr. or Ferr-ac. -- 329-336
Ferr-p. -- 337
Fl-ac. -- 338
Gamb. -- 339
Gels. -- 340-347
Glon. -- 348-351
Gnaph. -- 352
Graph. -- 352-359
Grat. -- 360
Grind. -- 360
Guaj. -- 361
Ham. -- 361-362
Hell. -- 363-364
Helon. -- 365-366
Hep. -- 367-376
Hydr. -- 377-378
Hydr-ac. -- 379
Hyos. -- 379-384
Hyper. -- 385
Ign. -- 385-393
Iod. -- 394-397
Ip. -- 398-406
Iris -- 407-408
Jal. -- 409
Jab. -- 409
Jatr. -- 410
Kali-bi. -- 410-417
Kali-br. -- 418
Kali-c. -- 419-425
Kali hydriodicum -- 426-432
Kali-m. -- 433
Kali-n. -- 434
Kali-p. -- 434
Kali-s. -- 435-436
Kalm. -- 437
Kreos. -- 438-440
Lac-c. -- 441-443
Lac-d. -- 444
Lach. -- 444-461
Lachn. -- 462
Lac-ac. -- 462
Lap-a. -- 462
Laur. -- 463-464
Led. -- 465-468
Lept. -- 469
Lil-t. -- 470-471
Lith. -- 472
Lob. -- 473
Lyc. -- 473-488
Lyss. -- 489
Mag-c. -- 490-491
Mag-m. -- 492
Mag-p. -- 493-496
Manganum aceticum -- 497
Med. -- 497-498
Meli. -- 499-500
Meny. -- 501
Merc-c. -- 501-502
Merc-cy. -- 503
Merc-d. -- 503
Mercurius protoiodide -- 504
Merc. -- 505-518
Mez. -- 519-521
Mill. -- 522
Mosch. -- 523
Murx. -- 524
Mur-ac. -- 525-527
Mygal. -- 528
Myrt-c. -- 528
Naja -- 528-529
Nat-c. -- 530
Nat-m. -- 531-550
Nat-p. -- 551
Nat-s. -- 551-554
Nit-ac. -- 555-557
Nuph. -- 558
Nux-m. -- 558-566
Nux-v. -- 567-579
Oci. -- 580
Olnd. -- 580
Op. -- 581-588
Ox-ac. -- 589
Pareir. -- 590
Par. -- 590-592
Petr. -- 593
Phel. -- 593
Ph-ac. -- 593-598
Phos. -- 599-623
Phys. -- 624
Phyt. -- 625-628
Pic-ac. -- 629
Plat. -- 630-632
Plb. -- 633-634
Podo. -- 635-641
Polyporus pinicola -- 642
Prun. -- 643
Psor. -- 643-650
Ptel. -- 651
Puls. -- 651-667
Pyrog. -- 668
Ran-b. -- 669
Raph. -- 669
Rheum -- 670
Rhod. -- 670-671
Rhus-r. -- 672
Rhus-t. -- 672-682
Rob. -- 683
Rumx. -- 684-685
Ruta -- 686
Sabad. -- 687-697
Sabin. -- 698
Samb. -- 699
Sang. -- 700-703
Sanic. -- 704
Sars. -- 704-705
Sec. --706-709
Sel. -- 710
Seneg. -- 711
Sep. -- 712-727
Sil. -- 728-735
Spig. -- 736-737
Spong. -- 738-741
Squil. -- 742
Stann. -- 743-744
Staph. -- 745-749
Stict. -- 750-752
Still. -- 753
Stram. -- 753-756
Sulph. -- 757-838
Sul-ac. -- 839-840
Symph. -- 841
Syph. -- 841
Tab. -- 841
Tarent-c. -- 842
Tarent. -- 842
Tarax. -- 843
Tell. -- 843
Ter. -- 844
Teucr. -- 845
Ther. -- 845-846
Thrombidium -- 847
Thuj. -- 847-850
Tril. -- 851
Tub. -- 851-858
Urt-u. -- 859
Ust. -- 859
Valer. -- 859
Verat. -- 860-863
Verat-v. -- 864-866
Verb. -- 867
Vib. -- 867
Viol-o. -- 868
Zinc. -- 868-872
Zing. -- 873-876
Repertory -- 877-922
Chest -- 877-888
Cough -- 889-898
Expectoration -- 899-901
Larynx & trachea -- 902-907
Respiration -- 908-916
Nasal Symptoms -- 917
Whooping Cough -- 918-922
Comments on Various Diseases and Remedies -- 923-943
Catarrh -- 923-925
Laryngitis -- 926-927
Croup -- 928-930
Bronchitis -- 931-932
Asthma -- 933
Pneumonia -- 934-937
Pulmonary tuberculosis -- 938-943
Case taking -- 944-962

Eugene Beauharis Nash

1838  -  1917

E. B. Nash was born in Hillsdale, Columbia County, N. Y., on March 8th, 1838.

At the age of seven he moved to Binghamton, N. Y. and graduated from the local Academy. He began his study of medicine with Dr. T. L. Brown of Binghamton, and graduated from Cleveland Homoeopathic Medical College in 1874.

Dr. Nash began homeopathic practice in Triangle, N. Y., and also practiced a short time in Harpersville, N. Y. He later moved to Cortland, N. Y., where he practiced until his death.

When Nash was beginning his medical career he was stricken with paralysis. He took Lachesis, but it only helped a little. Discouraged, he put himself under the care of the great master, Dr. Lippe.

The venerable doctor gave him a remedy. "When you are cured, come back and then I'll tell you what I gave." Dr. Nash later returned to Philadelphia. "Here I am, entirely well now. What was it?"

"Lachesis, Lachesis!"

"Yes, but I took Lachesis!"

The old doctor jumped up and down in his delight, and laughing, said:
"You did not take it high enough."

Dr. Nash was a member of the American Institute of Homoeopathy, of the New York State Homoeopathic Medical Society and an honorary member of the Pennsylvania State Homoeopathic Society.

He was, for seven years, Professor of Materia Medica in the New York Homoeopathic Medical College. In 1903 he became president of the International Hahnemannian Association (IHA). In 1905 he gave, by invitation, a course of lectures in the Homoeopathic Hospital of London.

Dr. Nash was considered one of the great teachers of medicine. His book, "Leaders of Homoeopathy," was thought to have been the means of converting many allopathic doctors to homeopathy.

Many homoeopathic physicians in different parts of the world attributed their success in healing the sick to his writings.

Doctor Nash was spoken of as a public-spirited citizen and as a warm and faithful friend, a genial host, and a devoted Sunday school worker.

Dr. Nash:

"Before I left home a physician said to me I don't enjoy very much going to the IHA because you are all in accord so that it makes a dull meeting. At the American Institute there is apt to be a lively time.

"That is true and the reason is because we subscribe to the same principles and act in harmony, if any man was to get on the wrong side of the law of cure, I thing we would give him a moderately lively time.

"We do not differ very much, and then only on details. Perhaps in my paper I did not make my main point prominent enough; it was that the symptoms are scientific, they fulfill all the requirements of strict science.

"There is misapprehension abroad that any method that takes cognizance of bacilli is scientific and anything that does not is unscientific. It is the method and the truth that make true science and that we have.

"Dr. Boger says that the keynotes are misleading; that may be sometimes, but they are also far oftener wonderful helpers or leaders to the understanding of a remedy in toto.

"If you were to attempt to teach materia medica without the use of keynotes our students would give it up. They are the road to the understanding of the materia medica.

"Dr. Waring spoke of the different values of particular symptoms and those of the general constitution. As a rule they correspond, but where they disagree his rule is right. It is a rule, however for exceptional cases, for if the patient is sensitive everywhere, then an injured or diseased part will be also sensitive as we find in the proving of Hepar sulphur.

Dr. Nash died on November 6, 1917. Shortly after his death, Dr. E. Jones wrote the following in The Homeopathic Recorder:

"I was very sorry to hear of the death of Dr. E.B. Nash: he was one of the great teachers of medicine. His book, Leaders of Homoeopathy, has been the means of bringing very many old school doctors out of darkness into light!

"He will live in his books and in the hearts of the many doctors he has helped to be better physicians. There are a host of homoeopathic physicians in different parts of the world to-day that owe their success in healing the sick to the writings of Dr. Eugene B. Nash.

""After lifes fitful dream he sleeps well".